Newcomers Special Track
No.

Full Weekend Tracks
Yes!
AFTER you are done with registration.

We will use your answers from the level check questionnaire below to assign you to a group for your Level Check Class. We will send you your Level Checks group one week before the event. This may not be your final placement.

You will attend a Level Check Class on Saturday early afternoon. The SATS audition team will determine your track group after they evaluate your dancing during those classes. We will do our best to place you with dancers of similar level.

There will be an appeal process, if you think you were not placed in the track that’s best for you.

Here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Dancers in each level will be on a range, you may be at the top of the range.
  • Dancing require a wide variety of skills, you may be great at some but not as great at others.
  • Instructors often teach the same material to multiple tracks.
  • You are not the best assessor of your dancing level.
  • Whatever track you end up in, there will be material for you to learn and practice, therefore you should do your best to get the most out of it.

Your track placement depends on who signs up for track classes, so we will not ask what track you think you belong in in the questionnaire.

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FULL WEEKEND

All non-newcomer track groups are folded into a single pool for registration called Full Weekend. Once registered, you have to fill out our Level Check Questionnaire.

Track group descriptions are available here.

NEWCOMERS SPECIAL

This track is for you if…

You are fairly new to Lindy Hop, or have only taken a handful of classes. This is your first Lindy Hop workshop weekend. You’re looking to learn a lot and have a lot of fun. This track will provide just the right amount of classes.

It is a more affordable track perfect for new dancers. The track will be taught by instructors Adam Brozowski & Joshua Mclean.

PARTNERED SWING DANCING ROLES

Partnered swing dancing is a role-based dance. There is a leader and there is a follower. Both partners contribute equally to the dance, but in different ways. The leader is the one usually initiating movement and thinking about the dance in terms of shapes. The follower interprets the lead and moves accordingly, adding their own contributions to the dance. The dancers send each other cues about their movements and intentions through their connection as well as visually. The dance becomes an unspoken conversation between the dancers.